Your Health and Safety is our Priority. Learn more about our COVID-19 Safety Protocols

Book an In-Office or Virtual Appointment

Media

April 11, 2005

The Best way to get fuller hair

First logo

The Best way to get fuller hair

More than 75 percent of women say they’d like their hair to appear thicker, according to research from Procter & Gamble. But hormonal fluctuations, free-radical damage from pollution and modern styling methods are standing in our way.” These culprits can shrinks hair follicles, causing strands to grow back thinner and weaker.” Explain Ken Washenik, M.D., Ph.D. professor of dermatology at New York University School of Medicine. Fortunately it’s now possible to prevent and even reverse this thinning. We interviewed the top hair-care scientist, reviewed the medical literature and sampled the latest products to bring you the best ways recapture and maintain full mane. (more…)

April 1, 2005

Nail Tip

upscale logo

Nail Tip

by Anthonia A. Oyefesobi

Studies suggest that your manicure or pedicure may be covering more than chipped polish. The color and texture of nails and surrounding tissue can be a warning signs of infection and serious health concerns in other areas of the body. According to Dr. Joshua Fox, founding director of Advance Dermatology, “changes in the appearance of the nails can indicate anything from a mild infection to a possibility of heart disease.”Those changes can also be a warning for lung or liver disease, diabetes or anemia. To avoid infection, Fox suggests keeping the nail area clean and dry and to avoid nail biting. Visit a doctor when changes such as red nail beds or yellowing and thickening occur and persist for more than a day or two.

March 7, 2005

What Your Nails Say About Your Health

WebMD

What Your Nails Say About Your Health

By Sherry Rauh

Take a good look at your fingernails and you may notice subtle variations in texture or color – a touch of white here, a rosy tinge there, perhaps some rippling bumps in the surface. These imperfections may not look like much to you, but to the trained eye they can provide valuable clues about your overall health.

>>>> read more…

March 1, 2005

How are tattoos removed?

SCIENTIC AMERICAN logo

February 28, 2005

Dermatologist Joshua L. Fox. Director of Advanced Dermatology P.C. and The Center for Laser and Cosmetic Surgery’s Center of Laser and Cosmetic Surgery in New York City Explain:

Industry expert say that 50 percent of people with tattoos will someday someday getting rid of their body art.more..

February 6, 2005

A mountain man needs face cream

chicago tribune logo

A mountain man needs face cream

by Judy Hevrdejs

Ski instructor Simon Unkovskov shuns face masks, Says they mess up his breathing and line of vision. Instead, he slathers on face cream for his on-hill time. Whether he’s teaching in Colorado or at the Wilmost Mountain Ski School just over the Wisconsin border.

>>>> read more…

February 1, 2005

Plumping Up Wrinkles

alternative medicine.com logo

Plumping Up Wrinkles

HA got its big breaks as a wrinkle-fighter in December 2003 and again last April, when the FDA approved
injectable Restylane and Hylaform, respectively, for use in filling in wrinkles around the nose and mouth. (more…)

February 1, 2005

A New Approach to Treating Troubling Marks

Today Parent logo

A New Approach to Treating Troubling Marks

By Joshua Fox, MD

Since the early 1900s, babies born with such disfiguring vascular birthmarks as hemagiomas and port wine stains – and their parents – have traditionally been met with a “hands-off” approach to treatment. But the medical community is slowly switching it’s tact from “watchful waiting” to early intervention, diagnosis and often even treatment.

>>>> read more…

January 24, 2005

Health Tips . . . from UPI

UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL logo

 

Health Tips . . . from UPI
By LIDIA WASOWICZ, UPI

NAILS AS MIRROR OF YOUR HEALTH

Nails often give the first indication of an underlying disease, a New York dermatologist says. Dr. Joshua Fox, Founding director of Advanced Dermatology P.C. and The Center for Laser and Cosmetic Surgery , says changes in the appearance of nails can point to an array of ailments, from a mild nail bed infection to heart disease. He says dark lines beneath the nails may indicate the skin cancer melanoma; white nails may point to liver diseases like hepatitis, half-white, half-pink could mean kidney malfunction; red may suggest heart disease, yellowing thickening nails, with slowing growth, may mean lung diseases such as emphysema; whitish nail beds might spell anemia; a slight blush at the base could be a warning of diabetes; and, irregular red lines at the base may be a sign of lupus or connective tissue disease. “Pitting” or rippling in the nail surface may signify psoriasis or inflammatory arthritis. Painful lumps at the matrix or under the nail surface may indicate a wart or tumor.

January 24, 2005

NAILS AS MIRROR OF YOUR HEALTH

Nurse week logo

NAILS AS MIRROR OF YOUR HEALTH

Nails often give the first indication of an underlying disease, a New York dermatologist says. Dr. Joshua Fox, Founding director of Advanced Dermatology P.C. and The Center for Laser and Cosmetic Surgery , says changes in the appearance of nails can point to an array of ailments, from a mild nail bed infection to heart disease. He says dark lines beneath the nails may indicate the skin cancer melanoma; white nails may point to liver diseases like hepatitis, half-white, half-pink could mean kidney malfunction; red may suggest heart disease, yellowing thickening nails, with slowing growth, may mean lung diseases such as emphysema; whitish nail beds might spell anemia; a slight blush at the base could be a warning of diabetes; and, irregular red lines at the base may be a sign of lupus or connective tissue disease. “Pitting” or rippling in the nail surface may signify psoriasis or inflammatory arthritis. Painful lumps at the matrix or under the nail surface may indicate a wart or tumor.

January 1, 2005

Nails Reflect More than Just Your Personal Style

DentalPlans.com logo

Nails Reflect More than Just Your Personal Style

Short or long, deep red or rosy pink, manicured or all natural, our nails can be a reflection of our personal tastes, our lifestyles, even our career choices. Nails help us manipulate small objects with our hands, and protect the soft tissues of our fingers and toes. But perhaps most importantly – and surprisingly, our nails can often give the first indication of an underlying disease or medical condition in the body. (more…)

October 26, 2004

The Manicure Tip That Prevents Colds!

The Manicure Tip That Prevents Colds!

Outsmart the bacteria that can make you sick by sporting this season’s new fingernail shape: short and round. “Viruses and bacteria can hide and thrive underneath nails, especially long nails and acrylics,” explains New York City dermatologist Joshua L. Fox, M.D. “Since it’s hard to wash away germs under long nails without a nail brush, keeping nails short can keep you healthy.”

October 26, 2004

Banishing Birthmarks With MRIs: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Can Guide Treatment, Say Experts

WebMD logo    &         fox-news-logo

By Miranda Hitti

Treating some unsightly birthmarks is easier with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), say researchers from Case Western Reserve University.

Birthmarks can be more than a common cosmetic annoyance. Some of these malformations cause a bluish skin discoloration, local swelling, and pain.

While some of these vascular birthmarks vanish with age and many remain stable, others worsen over time, causing disfigurement and bleeding. Most birthmarks are just colored skin spots, which may be raised above the surface of surrounding skin. In rare cases, they may indicate more serious health problems.

Birthmarks don’t necessarily require treatment. Unless there’s a medical, emotional, or cosmetic reason for removal, many birthmarks could stay harmlessly in place, if that’s what the patient prefers.

Jonathan Lewin, MD, and colleagues recently performed imaging of these vascular birthmarks with MRIs on 15 adults who wanted them removed. He chairs the radiology department at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Md.

Diagnosing these abnormal veins which make up the birthmarks is easy on exam, yet an MRI image is necessary to confirm the diagnosis. Imaging assesses the extent of these lesions, which can involve not only the skin but can involve muscle and deeper tissues layers.

Experienced and trained radiologists performed a procedure called sclerotherapy that constricts these abnormal veins that made up the birthmarks. The procedure involves injecting a scarring solution directly into the lesion.

In the study a total of 76 birthmarks were successfully treated. MRI was used to guide and monitor the operation, as well as in verifying results and conducting follow-up examinations.

Without MRI, it can be tough to catch all the veins in such birthmarks, as well as little extensions that often run from the veins into surrounding tissue.

MRI makes those veins as ‘bright as light bulbs’ says Lewin in a news release.

Lewin and colleagues call MRI-guided sclerotherapy for treatment of these vascular birthmarks safe and effective in their report, which appears in The November issue of The journal Radiology.

The researchers also note that using MRI imaging of the birthmark during the procedure significantly shortened the procedure time, easing patients’ anxieties.

The operations length was “the most physically stressful and disturbing part of the entire treatment,” they write.

In addition, patients stayed awake during the procedure and could “directly communicate sensations of pain or discomfort to the performing radiologist, who in turn was able to respond immediately by changing the needle location or the amount of sclerosing agent applied.”

In the past, parents and doctors were often reluctant to treat birthmarks in babies and children, says New York dermatologist Joshua Fox, MD, in a news release.

Fox, who was not involved in the MRI birthmark study, says technological advances (such as laser treatments) have made it possible to treat birthmarks in children at younger ages.