Posts Tagged ‘NewsRX’


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Dermatologist Dr. Joshua Fox, Even in the Smartest Cities in the U.S., Misconceptions Remain

When it comes to safe sun habits, many Americans are still in the Dark Ages. A new report from the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) shows there is plenty of room for improvement across the country, but especially in the cities that fared the worst in its “Suntelligence” survey, which measured both beliefs and behaviors related to sun exposure in more than 7,000 adults nationwide. That survey found the smartest people, sun-wise, in Hartford, Salt Lake City, Denver and Tampa. The least sun-savvy folks were in Pittsburgh, Chicago, Cleveland and Seattle.

“Most people know that getting a blistering sunburn—or baking themselves brown every summer—isn’t good for their skin,” says Joshua L. Fox, M.D., a leading dermatologist and Medical Director of Advanced Dermatology PC of New York and New Jersey PC. “But we’re fuzzy on some of the finer points of sun exposure,” he says. “Many people don’t like using lots of lotion, or want to look tan without getting wrinkles—or cancer—so they’re willing to believe that their unsafe habits are perfectly fine.”

The AAD survey brought up several common misconceptions about sun exposure. Here are the five biggest—and the reality behind them:

• Getting a “base tan” is a good way to avoid sunburn (and sun damage).
“Trying to save your skin through preemptive tanning is an exercise in insanity”, says Dr. Fox (but it still makes sense to more than half the respondents). “A tan gives the equivalent of an SPF 4—not a lot of protection, and certainly not worth the damage and risk. The base tan itself causes skin damage.” Repeated exposure to UV radiation—even if it’s done with good intentions—leads to premature aging and possibly cancer later in life.

• You need sun exposure to get the Vitamin D your body needs.
About sixty percent of the people in the AAD’s study said that sun exposure was good for one’s health. A big part of that misconception comes from news reports on sunlight’s role in producing Vitamin D, which the body uses to help build bone, among other things. “But these reports are misleading”, Dr. Fox says. “Vitamin D is essential,” he says, “but sun exposure is not essential for Vitamin D production.” “Instead”, he says, “you should eat a healthy diet, with plenty of natural and fortified foods, and take a supplement of up to 1000 units of Vitamin D to make up for any dietary shortfalls.”

• Tanning beds have gotten a bad rap, but they’re still better than natural sunlight.
Nearly 30 million Americans visit tanning salons every year, and the AAD report found that only about one-third of adults realize they’re unsafe. “However, indoor tanning is associated with a seventy-five percent increase in the risk of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer”, says Dr. Fox. Last year, the International Agency for Research on Cancer -a division of the World Health Organization – labeled indoor tanning a carcinogenic and put it in the highest risk category, right next to tobacco smoke. Many states have recently put restrictions on tanning beds for people under age 18 – some states now require parental consent and other states are considering banning tanning beds altogether for minors.

• Sunscreen with SPF 30 gives twice the protection of SPF 15. And SPF 90 delivers three times as much as SPF 30—enough to keep you safe on the planet Mercury.
The AAD’s study found that eight out of ten people believe this (it does seem logical: If you’re driving at 90 miles per hour, you’re going three times as fast as if you were driving at 30 MPH). “But there are a few things wrong with this theory”, says Dr. Fox. First of all, the sun protection factor, or SPF, refers to UVB rays. To get UVA protection, you need a sunscreen labeled ’broad spectrum‘ or one that contains a physical block like titanium dioxide. Secondly, UVB protection doesn’t increase proportionately with the SPF number. For example, SPF 30 screens about ninety-seven percent of the UVB rays, whereas SPF 15 screens ninety-three percent (SPF 2 stops about only fifty percent). “The difference in protection between SPF 30 and anything higher is relatively negligible”, reports Dr. Fox.

“Another factor here is application”, adds Dr. Fox. Using too little or reapplying too infrequently effectively reduces a product’s SPF—and leaves you exposed to sun damage. “The rule is to apply about an ounce—an amount equal to that which would fill a standard shot glass—over your body and to reapply it every two hours, more often if you’re swimming, sweating or playing sports,” he advises. “Don’t let an astronomical SPF number give you a false sense of security. In fact, in 2009 the FDA came out with a new regulation prohibiting manufacturers from claiming SPF’s of greater than 50+.

• Let’s face it: You look better—and healthier—with a tan.
Many associate a suntan with wealth and success (picture those rich, leisure-class types on their tennis courts and yachts). “But a tan is nothing more than a record of sun damage”, says Dr. Fox. “It’s the evidence of all the ultraviolet radiation that your skin has been exposed to—and had to protect itself against.”
Indeed, despite the evidence to the contrary, more than seventy percent of survey participants think people look more attractive with a tan. So instead of bucking the trend, Dr. Fox suggests using a self-tanner (with sunscreen, of course). “You’ll get that tanned look, but without the damage”, recommends Dr. Fox.


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Leading Dermatologist Dr. Joshua Fox on Removing Unsightly, Painful Corns and Calluses 

Sarah Brown, wife of U.K. Prime Minister Gordon Brown, made headlines recently when she removed her shoes at a Hindu temple, displaying the corns and calluses on her feet. She joined celebrities including Katie Holmes, Amanda Bynes and Rihanna, who are known for having less-than-perfect-feet.

In fact, nearly 10 percent of American women and five percent of the population as a whole suffer from unsightly, often painful corns and calluses that make their feet best suited for boots and other winter shoe styles. But according to dermatologist Dr. Joshua Fox, “by taking care of these problems now, woman and men can enjoy the summer in sandals or their bare feet.”

“Corns and calluses are caused by friction and pressure on the feet, either from wearing shoes that don’t fit properly or from conditions such as arthritis, trauma, bunions or various deformities,” says Dr. Fox, founder of Advanced Dermatology and a spokesperson for the American Academy of Dermatology.

“While most corns and calluses are unsightly, only some cause pain. If you are in good health, you don’t have to see a professional for corns and calluses unless they hurt or bother your walking. But, if you don’t like the way your feet look, if you are having pain or if you have certain medical conditions including diabetes, poor circulation or numbness in the feet, it’s important that you see a doctor or podiatrist who can evaluate the problem and help you remove the corns and calluses.”

According to Harry Baldinger, M.D., an esteemed podiatrist in Monsey, N.Y., “Most people do not get calluses or corns. People do get them when there is extra friction at some point during the gait cycle. Sometimes the cause is the structure of the foot which could be adjusted with devices, biomechanical and padding devices.” “Sometimes, surgical intervention is needed if the foot structure is out of the ‘normal’ range. Usually, this type of surgery is NOT cosmetic in nature but rather to make the foot fit the shoe,” adds Dr. Baldinger.

Dr. Fox explains that the yellow or gray, thick, hardened, dead skin on the feet known as calluses and corns form to protect the skin from pressure, friction and injury. While both calluses and corns are less sensitive to the touch than surrounding skin and may feel bumpy, the two are different. Both calluses and hard corns are hard, dry and thick, while a soft corn looks like an open sore. Corns that are neglected can turn into sores which may become infected. Both corns and calluses are diagnosed during a physical exam; your doctor may want to x-ray the foot if he or she suspects a problem with the underlying bone which can be treated by a podiatrist or orthopedic surgeon.

“The best way to remove a corn or callus is to prevent it from forming in the first place,” says Dr. Fox, who offers several at-home suggestions to prevent corns and calluses from forming. “Wear shoes that fit well and give your toes plenty of room,” he says. “Wear protective coverings such as felt pads, lambs wool, cotton balls or bandages over the parts of your feet that rub against your shoes. If that doesn’t work and you’ve developed a corn or callus, you can try an at-home treatment,” he adds.

If you start to feel pain, Dr. Fox says, the first thing to do is to remove the pressure or friction that is causing the problem, giving it time to heal. This is done by wearing shoes that fit properly and using protective padding, which can be purchased at a drug store, to cushion the callus or corn. Podiatrists can make a specialized shoe for your foot to remove pressure. “Don’t use liquid corn removers containing salicylic acid,” he says. “This can irritate healthy skin and promote infection. Soaking your feet in warm, soapy water can soften corns and calluses, making it easier to remove the thickened skin.”

Dr. Fox also recommends rubbing corns and calluses with a pumice stone or washcloth during or after bathing to help remove a layer of thickened skin, and following that with moisturizer. “Never cut or shave calluses or corns yourself, as this could cause infection.”

Dr. Baldinger advises, “An evaluation by a professional is a worthwhile investment for the future in any case. Until a patient can get to their doctor (dermatologist/podiatrist is best), a useful over-the-counter product that works to remove the hardened skin and soften the underlying skin is KERASAL’s One-Step Exfoliating and Moisturizing Ointment ™, which is available in most pharmacies or doctor’s offices (KerasalPro Ointment)”.

For stubborn, painful corns and calluses or those that you feel are particularly unsightly, see your podiatrist or dermatologist, who can evaluate the problem and remove the dead skin safely, Dr. Fox says. “It’s important to call your doctor if you cut a corn or callus, which could cause infection; if it oozes pus or clear fluid, both of which mean it is infected; or if you develop a corn or callus and you suffer from diabetes, heart disease or other circulatory problems.” During an office visit, he says, your doctor may trim the thickened skin with a scalpel, apply a patch containing salicylic acid and may recommend applying an antibiotic ointment to reduce the risk of infection. In severe cases, your doctor may recommend surgery to correct the alignment of the bones in your feet that are causing the problem.


newsrx

Getting perfect skin — a face that’s free of lines, wrinkles, sun damage and other signs of aging — is a lofty goal, but it’s at the heart of almost every cosmetic procedure from facials to full-scale facelifts. Women in search of perfection and contemplating these procedures typically ask their friends and acquaintances for recommendations before scheduling an appointment. But if we’re considering a brand-new technology, most of us don’t know anyone who’s cutting-edge enough to have that kind of experience.

That’s why a recent study on the new Pixel Perfect laser is such good news: The report was presented by the New Age Skin Research Foundation (www.nasrf.org), a not-for-profit medical organization committed to improving the quality of life of those with skin conditions at the recent annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology. The report shows that the majority of the women who have tried the Pixel laser loved it and would recommend it to a friend.

“The patients we spoke with confirmed what we already knew,” says Joshua Fox, M.D., founder and president of NASRF and a leading dermatologist who uses the Pixel laser in his practice. “The laser offers the best of both worlds: the dramatic results of a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser with the comfort and convenience of less invasive procedures namely, minimal downtime and risks.”

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) lasers, which have been the gold standard when it comes to nonsurgical rejuvenation, offer patients with moderate to severe signs of aging some of the most dramatic results this side of the scalpel: lessening wrinkles, reducing all sorts of scars, diminishing sun damage and tightening sagging skin through a process with collagen tightening, remodeling and new collagen formation, known as laser resurfacing. Along with erbium YAG lasers, traditional CO2 lasers are what’s known as ablative, meaning they carefully remove a small amount of skin, thus stimulating the skin to heal itself (and repair those lines and wrinkles in the process). However, an ablative laser treatment previously involved a significant amount of discomfort and several weeks of healing time and redness.

The new Pixel Perfect laser is different because it’s fractionated, meaning the laser’s beam is separated into many tiny dots, each of which makes a microscopic hole, called a micro injury, in the top few layers of the skin. The holes are spaced evenly, with areas of untouched skin in between (about 65 percent of the skin in a treated area will be untouched by the laser). As the skin heals, they produce immediate tightening and texture and color improvements. And over the next one to two months, they’ll also trigger new collagen production in the skin, which works to plump up the skin and continue the improvements on the surface.

Because the fractionated laser leaves so much skin untouched, it creates much less injury and allows the skin to help its damaged areas heal much more quickly with minimal risk. “We’re seeing patients recovering in about three to seven days,” Dr. Fox says. “That’s a huge improvement over the months it use to take to get over a traditional ablative laser resurfacing. We have not seen any cases of scarring and the patients are thrilled by the results.”

“Many of my patients told me they had considered laser skin resurfacing, dermabrasion or deep chemical peels, but were put off because of the long recovery times,” Dr. Fox says. He notes that a treatment with the Pixel Perfect laser typically takes between less than an hour, requires no intravenous anesthesia, and carries much less risk of scarring or pigmentation irregularities than the traditional CO2 laser does. The new study confirms that the Pixel Perfect laser seems to be the solution for many of these patients, he adds, providing significant changes without the discomfort and downtime of traditional ablative lasers.


newsrx

BEAUTY NEWS: New research proves that the new Pixel Perfect laser lives up to its name

Getting perfect skin — a face that’s free of lines, wrinkles, sun damage and other signs of aging — is a lofty goal, but it’s at the heart of almost every cosmetic procedure from facials to full-scale facelifts. Women in search of perfection and contemplating these procedures typically ask their friends and acquaintances for recommendations before scheduling an appointment. But if we’re considering a brand-new technology, most of us don’t know anyone who’s cutting-edge enough to have that kind of experience.

That’s why a recent study on the new Pixel Perfect laser is such good news: The report was presented by the New Age Skin Research Foundation (www.nasrf.org), a not-for-profit medical organization committed to improving the quality of life of those with skin conditions at the recent annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology. The report shows that the majority of the women who have tried the Pixel laser loved it and would recommend it to a friend.

“The patients we spoke with confirmed what we already knew,” says Joshua Fox, M.D., founder and president of NASRF and a leading dermatologist who uses the Pixel laser in his practice. “The laser offers the best of both worlds: the dramatic results of a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser with the comfort and convenience of less invasive procedures namely, minimal downtime and risks.”

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) lasers, which have been the gold standard when it comes to nonsurgical rejuvenation, offer patients with moderate to severe signs of aging some of the most dramatic results this side of the scalpel: lessening wrinkles, reducing all sorts of scars, diminishing sun damage and tightening sagging skin through a process with collagen tightening, remodeling and new collagen formation, known as laser resurfacing. Along with erbium YAG lasers, traditional CO2 lasers are what’s known as ablative, meaning they carefully remove a small amount of skin, thus stimulating the skin to heal itself (and repair those lines and wrinkles in the process). However, an ablative laser treatment previously involved a significant amount of discomfort and several weeks of healing time and redness.

The new Pixel Perfect laser is different because it’s fractionated, meaning the laser’s beam is separated into many tiny dots, each of which makes a microscopic hole, called a micro injury, in the top few layers of the skin. The holes are spaced evenly, with areas of untouched skin in between (about 65 percent of the skin in a treated area will be untouched by the laser). As the skin heals, they produce immediate tightening and texture and color improvements. And over the next one to two months, they’ll also trigger new collagen production in the skin, which works to plump up the skin and continue the improvements on the surface.

Because the fractionated laser leaves so much skin untouched, it creates much less injury and allows the skin to help its damaged areas heal much more quickly with minimal risk. “We’re seeing patients recovering in about three to seven days,” Dr. Fox says. “That’s a huge improvement over the months it use to take to get over a traditional ablative laser resurfacing. We have not seen any cases of scarring and the patients are thrilled by the results.”

“Many of my patients told me they had considered laser skin resurfacing, dermabrasion or deep chemical peels, but were put off because of the long recovery times,” Dr. Fox says. He notes that a treatment with the Pixel Perfect laser typically takes between less than an hour, requires no intravenous anesthesia, and carries much less risk of scarring or pigmentation irregularities than the traditional CO2 laser does. The new study confirms that the Pixel Perfect laser seems to be the solution for many of these patients, he adds, providing significant changes without the discomfort and downtime of traditional ablative lasers.

About Dr. Fox: Joshua L. Fox, M.D., F.A.A.D., earned his medical degree from the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in New York. He completed an internship at Maimonides Hospital in Brooklyn, followed by a three-year dermatology residency at the New York University School of Medicine. A Fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology, Dr. Fox is a leading authority in the field of dermatology, with an expertise in skin cancer, cosmetic surgery and laser procedures. He is the founder and director of Advanced Dermatology, P.C. of New York and New Jersey and the Center for Laser and Cosmetic Surgery (www.advancedd.com) and is a spokesman for both the American Academy of Dermatology and the American Society of Dermatologic Surgery. He is founder and president of New Age Research Foundation, a non-profit committed to improving the quality of life of those with skin conditions (www.newageskin.org).

Contact: Melissa Chefec, MCPR Public Relations, 203-968-6625