Extreme Waxing: Is It Safe?

Extreme Waxing: Is It Safe?

Turns out you’d be wise to take a few precautions.
ASK FOR CREDENTIALS
Not all states require a cosmetologist’s or esthetician’s license for waxing, so check to see that the person performing your treatment attended a school approved by the National Accrediting Commission of Cosmetology Arts and Sciences.

CHECK YOUR MEDS
Drugs such as Accutane and Retin-A, as well as anti-aging moisturizers with glycolic acid, can increase irritation from waxing. Consult your doctor if you’re taking any meds.

BE ON HIGH-HYGIENE ALERT
Inflamed hair follicles (folliculitis) can be caused by bacteria or fungi. That’s why waxing practitioners must wear latex gloves and use a new wax applicator for each client.

EXFOLIATE AFTERWARDS
Ingrown hairs, which occur when new hairs curl and grow back into the skin, can be dangerous as well as unsightly. In some very rare cases, an untreated ingrown hair can result in a staph infection that can be so severe as to be resistant to oral antibiotics, according to New York dermatologist Joshua Fox. Meaning: “You’d have to he hospitalized and treated with a powerful antibiotic intravenously.” To keep hair follicles unclogged, aesthetician Gissele Padllha recommends washing with a gentle antibacterial soap and exfoliating daily.

(For info, call: 718-357-8200)